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Healthy eating and fitness is the way to go.Sun, 07 Nov 2010 07:06:31 +0000enhourly1http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.1What do YOU eat in your yoga lifestyle?http://www.livingthehealthyway.info/2010/10/08/what-do-you-eat-in-your-yoga-lifestyle/

http://www.livingthehealthyway.info/2010/10/08/what-do-you-eat-in-your-yoga-lifestyle/#commentsFri, 08 Oct 2010 07:03:01 +0000Adminhttp://www.livingthehealthyway.info/?p=678Donna Amrita Davidge has been teaching yoga since the mid-80’s and owns and operates www.sewallhouse.com Yoga Retreat in Maine, a small personalized yoga retreat which serves acclaimed vegetarian food and was chosen top ten worldwide in 2009 and 2010.

Donna/Amrita holds a Masters in Nutrition, has been featured in print and on radio and television over her years of teaching, as well as produced several yoga products for home use.

Yoga takes many forms these days and so does approach to nutrition in yoga. Some people are raw food advocates, sure that the living food is better than cooked food.

The more common route is vegetarianism, keeping the body lighter and cleaner feeling while helping digestion and elimination. Very few yoga teachers advocate the consumption of meat but some do. The same goes for alcohol. It truly depends on why and what kind of yoga you are practicing. If you are simply doing yoga as a workout

the philosophical and health reasons for not eating meat or drinking alcohol may not come in to play. The physical poses are meant to help us become more flexible and strong but also to purify the body. If we are putting lots of junk, chemicals and additives and meats whose source and treatment while alive is questionable then energetically we are not preparing a pure vessel for our yoga practice and we will progress only so far in the whole package. Yoga, when taken in its totality, is good for the mind, body and breath. Some of the more rigorous forms of yoga, like Ashtanga and Vinyasa, are like a meditation in motion. If you are not focusing your breath and mind properly the practice is incomplete. The more aware we become through our yoga practice the more attention we may pay to our eating habits and nutrition.

Another thing that comes into play nutritionally in yoga is Ayurveda, the science of life. Whether we are fiery pita constitution, earthbound kapha or airy vata we might make food choices to ease imbalances in our body and temperament. More and more yoga teachers and practitioners are using Ayurveda in conjunction with their yoga practice and approach to eating. Kundalini Yoga encourages fiery foods like garlic, ginger and onion while Sivananda Yoga discourages the use of these, considering them to be harmful to the calming and peaceful influence we are seeking in our yoga practice.

With all these opinions our there, what is right for you? Experiment and see. Some people find they are gluten intolerant, others feel better or worse without meat. In the end it is your body and your health. If pursuing yoga philosophically then for the purposes of ahimsa, nonviolence, it us useful to avoid eating meat as an animal has been killed so that you may eat it.

One thing you want to do anyway is include fresh whole foods and eat enough, not too much. Yogis agree that overating is not desirable for health or for your practice. It is best to practice on an empty or nearly empty stomach. Your body is a temple and as Yogi Bhajan, Master of Kundalini Yoga said, be mindful of what goes in and out of all your holes. There is some food for thought!

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